Sunday, August 17, 1969

Chess

by richard shorman

TOURNAMENT RESULTS

   Mike Goodall directed the first Chabot College Open in Hayward, August 10-11. The event was fully rated by CFNC.

CLASS "A": 1-2. Randall Hough, Stockton, and Raymond Ng, Livermore, 3.5-1.5, $20 each; 3. Alan Lavergne, Menlo Park, 3-2, trophy.
CLASS "B": 1. Norman Wild, San Jose, 4.5-.5, $25; 2-5. James Shearer, Livermore, James Evans, Sebastopol, Charles Maddigan, Oakland, and Tom Makens, San Francisco, 4-1, $3.75 each.
CLASS "C": 1. Leonard Petty, Oakland, 4.5-.5, $25; 2-3, Stephen Gee, San Francisco, and Craig Barnes, Berkeley, 4-1, $7.50 each.

*     *     *

   With the center locked, action on one wing must be met with threats on the other side of the board.

White: Garry Wilson.     Black: Alan Lavergne.

Chabot Open, Aug. 11, 1969.
King's Indian Defense

 1 P-QB4      N-KB3
 2 N-QB3      P-KN3
 3 P-KN3      B-N2
 4 B-N2        0-0
 5 N-B3        P-Q3
 6 P-Q4        N-B3
 7 0-0(a)       B-N5
 8 P-KR3      BxN
 9 BxB          N-Q2
10 P-K3(b)    P-K4
11 P-Q5        N-K2
12 B-N2        P-KB4(c)
13 P-B3        P-PN4
14 P-K4        P-B5
15 P-KN4      N-KN3
16 B-Q2        K-B2
17 Q-K2        R-R1
18 R-QB1      P-QR3(d)
19 P-QN4      P-KR4
20 P-QR4(e)  Q-KN1
21 R-KB2      N-R5
22 B-R1        Q-R2
23 R-R2        N-B3

24 P-B5(f)     B-B1
25 N-Q1(g)    K-N1
26 P-R5         R-N1
27 N-N2         B-K2
28 N-R4         R-KB1(h)
29 PxQP        BxP
30 N-B5         PxP
31 RPxP        BxN
32 PxB          NxNP
33 PxN          P-B6
34 Q-K3        R-B5
35 P-B6(i)     RxPch
36 K-B1        PxP
37 PxP(j)       Q-B2
38 B-K1        N-N7
39 RxRch       KxR
40 Q-Q3        Q-B3
41 B-B2        Q-B5
42 R-N1        Q-B1
43 R-Q1        Q-KN1
44 Q-Q5        Q-K1
45 Q-Q7        Q-R4
46 Q-Q8ch    Resigns

(a) Putting the question to the Knight leaves Black surprisingly well posted, e.g., 7 P-Q5 N-R4! 8 P-N3 (8 N-Q2 P-K4) P-B3 9 B-N2 PxP 10 PxP (10 NxP? NxN 11 BxB N-K6!) N-K5 (MCO 10, pg. 455).

(b) Najdorf - Geller, Zurich, 1953, continued 10 B-B2 NxP 11 BxP R-N1 12 B-N2 R-N5 13 P-K3 N-K3 14 Q-K2 N-K4! 15 P-B4 N-Q2 16 N-Q5 R-N1 17 Q-QB2 P-QB3 18 N-B3 Q-B2 19 R-N1 P-QR4 20 B-Q2 N/3-B4, which David Bronstein evaluates as good for Black in his book, International Grandmaster Tournament (Moscow, 1956, pg. 393).

(c) Having achieved the ideal pawn formation in this defense, Black will concentrate further efforts on opening a file close to the enemy King, while White will seek his fortune on the Queen side.

(d) Black pays dearly throughout the game for this purposeless move. An immediate 18 P-KR4 makes more sense.

(e) Both sides have maintained a fine balance of terror on opposite wings.

(f) Pursuing his original plan in the midst of expert defense, White makes his bid to seize the strategic initiative.

(g) Beginning a long journey, characteristic of closed positions, to reach the best possible square: N-B3-Q1-N2-R4-B5.

(h) In this position Black may already have envisaged his Knight sacrifice on move 32.

(i) Consistent to the finish, penetration on one flank is matched by a counter-thrust on the other side.

(j) Threatening 38 BxP, as 38 R-B5 loses to 39 Q-N3ch and 40 BxR. More active, however, is 37 RxP, e.g., 37 QxP (37 Q-B2 38 B-B3) 38 QxQ RxQ 39 BxNP or 37 N-N7 38 RxQ NxQch 39 BxN RxR 40 BxBP R-B2 41 K-B2, and White wins more efficiently than in the game.

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